Standing together by staying apart and physically active

Standing together by staying apart and physically active

In August 2013 the UN General Assembly made the decision to proclaim 6 April as the International Day of Sport for Development and Peace. It is a very noble idea which has developed in an annual celebration of the power of sport and its intrinsic and unique ability to foster peace and understanding, drive social change and community development.

As we all know, the world is fighting an unprecedented health crisis when populations are being asked to stay at home to contain the spread of COVID-19. That does not mean we should stop being physically active, nor should we disconnect from the coaches, teammates, instructors and fellow fans who not only help us to stay physically fit but also socially active. The IOC and the whole Olympic Movement are joining the global effort to encourage everyone to be active and stay healthy; the IBU is part of that.

Standing together by staying apart and physically active

Some biathletes have already shared their ideas and tips on how to stay fit and healthy on their social media channels. World Cup Total Score winner Dorothea Wierer is doing one hour of stationary cycling as part her daily routine. Valeriya Vasnetsova and Larisa Kuklina presented leg workouts at home. Yulia Dzhima showed how she is using the staircase in her apartment block to work on her speed and endurance.

Elisa Gasparin demonstrated how a workout combined of stretching, core and strength training and co-ordination exercises can very effectively be done in your living room using your sofa, a full bottle of detergent and a set of salad servers. Philipp Horn planned to be on holiday but is nonetheless enjoying his slack training in his native region of Thuringen in Germany. Amanda Lightfoot is using the help and the body weight of her nephew hanging from her back to get more out of her training.

The World Health Organization recommends 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week, or a combination of both.The World Health Organization recommends 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week, or a combination of both.

WHO also has some tips on how to achieve this with no equipment and limited space.

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